ASRock z390 Pro4 Review

The ASRock z390 Pro 4 is a high-end motherboard that has been floating around the market for some time and hasn’t really gained any traction. 

Given the stellar reputation of ASRock, we found this strange and decided to test it out, thinking that we’d found a diamond in the rough.

ASRock z390 Pro4 Review

In this review, we check out the features and specs of the ASRock z390, as well as its power consumption and overclocking abilities. 

We also cover some pros and cons. 

If you’re a PC enthusiast, builder, or simply looking for an upgrade, this article is for you.

ASRock Motherboard (Z390 PRO4)
  • LGA1151 Supports 9th and 8th Generation Intel Core Processors
  • Chipset: Intel Z390
  • Memory: 4x DDR4 DIMM Slots, Dual Channel, Non-ECC, Unbuffered, Max Capacity of 64GB
  • Slots: 2x PCI-Express 3.0 x16 Slots (run single at x16 or dual at x16/x4), 3x PCI-Express 3.0 x1 Slots (Flexible PCIe)
  • Multi-Graphics: Supports AMD Quad CrossFireX, CrossFireX Technology

ASRock z390 Pro4 (Our Review)

Overall Assessment

The ASRock z390 Pro4, also known as the z390 Steel Legend, is one of ASRock’s more mainstream motherboards. It supports 8th and 9th Gen Intel Core processors and is known for its performance, aesthetics, and features.

Aesthetically, the z390 Pro4 looks amazing. Like most ASRock motherboards, the z390 has a sleek black and gray color theme, embossed with delicate gear imagery. The board is covered with aluminum alloy heat sinks which increase stability and overclocking potential.

With regards to audio, the ASRock z390 sports a Realtek ALC1200 chip which is honorable considering the price.

Packaging and Extra Components

This might sound strange but we’re sticklers for packaging. The ASRock z390 comes in new boxes styled specifically for the Steel Legend range of motherboards. 

Flipping the box over, we see an overview of the motherboard and the rear I/O (input/output). Inside, we find the sleek z390 Steel Legend motherboard, as well as an I/O shield. The board comes with two SATA cables and screws for the M.2 slots. 

Additional components include a driver, utility CD, a cool case sticker, and a software and hardware setup guide. 

ASRock also included a gorgeous Steel Legend postcard which we thought was a nice touch. 

Features

For storage, the ASRock z390 sports two PCIe 3.0×4 and SATA supported M.2 slots. In total, the board has six SATA ports, four of which are right-angled and two are straight-angled. 

This allows you to install six hard drives, SSDs, or DVD drives depending on your needs. 

The z390 has a slightly different setup compared to the ASRock z270 extreme4, with a dual M.2 slot offering PCIe 3.0×4 while the other port allows for both PCIe 3.0×4 and SATA drivers. 

ASRock Motherboard (Z390 PRO4)
  • LGA1151 Supports 9th and 8th Generation Intel Core Processors
  • Chipset: Intel Z390
  • Memory: 4x DDR4 DIMM Slots, Dual Channel, Non-ECC, Unbuffered, Max Capacity of 64GB
  • Slots: 2x PCI-Express 3.0 x16 Slots (run single at x16 or dual at x16/x4), 3x PCI-Express 3.0 x1 Slots (Flexible PCIe)
  • Multi-Graphics: Supports AMD Quad CrossFireX, CrossFireX Technology

However, unlike ASRock z270, the z390 is sparsely populated in order to increase airflow and aid with cooling, preventing the motherboard from overheating.

The rear of the board has two USB 3.1 Gen 2 (Type A and Type C) ports, two USB 3.0 Type A ports, and two USB 2.0 ports. 

In terms of features and layout, the ASRock z390M Pro4 and ASRock z390 Pro4 are somewhat similar. The major differences between the two are the form factor and the PCIe layout, which is strange given the price difference ($30 more for the z390 Pro4). 

Power Consumption

Before we get into this section we need to make something clear. The power consumption measurements are dependent on your PC and setup. Therefore, take this review as a benchmark. 

When idle, the ASRock z390 consumes around 60W with the added controllers, Wi-Fi modules, and the PSU (efficiency). Any other components added will draw additional power. 

When testing the peak power consumption, the motherboard consumed around 200W which is higher than the ASRock Z97 Extreme4, clocking in around 250W. 

Overall, when undergoing stress tests, the temperatures were average at 158°F which isn’t worryingly high. We would recommend you install a good cooling system to keep things running smoothly. 

Overclocking

The ASRock z390 Pro 4 is similar to the ASRock z370 Pro4 in terms of its overclocking. 

We tested the overclocking of the z390 in the BIOS. The first thing we did was set the CPU ratio mode to “All Core.” In this mode, the cores ran at 5.1 GHz. We fiddled with the voltage and power settings and decided on a 1.30V as a stable VCore voltage. 

With these settings, we noticed that the processor would throttle although our AIDA64 didn’t pick up any thermal throttling. However, we did notice that a few of our components were overheating. 

We experienced similar problems with the ASRock z390 Taichi. If you’re planning on overclocking, this might not be the board for you. 

Pros

  • Affordable
  • Sports an Intel B365 chipset
  • Has 2 Ultra M.2 slots for SSDs
  • Allows users to connect 3 monitors
ASRock Motherboard (Z390 PRO4)
  • LGA1151 Supports 9th and 8th Generation Intel Core Processors
  • Chipset: Intel Z390
  • Memory: 4x DDR4 DIMM Slots, Dual Channel, Non-ECC, Unbuffered, Max Capacity of 64GB
  • Slots: 2x PCI-Express 3.0 x16 Slots (run single at x16 or dual at x16/x4), 3x PCI-Express 3.0 x1 Slots (Flexible PCIe)
  • Multi-Graphics: Supports AMD Quad CrossFireX, CrossFireX Technology

Cons

  • The voltage regulator thermal throttling is not suited to Core i7
  • Lacks a USB 3.1 Gen 2 slot
  • The second x16-length slot only has 4 chipset lanes

Common Questions about the ASRock z390 Pro4

Does the ASRock z390 Pro4 have Wi-Fi?

The ASRock z390 Pro4 has Wi-Fi capabilities but it does not come with a pre-installed module. If you decide to go with this board, you’ll have to purchase a compatible Wi-Fi module.

We find it strange that a majority of ASRock motherboards lack Wi-Fi modules since most low-end motherboards have this feature.

Does ASRock z390 Pro4 have RGB?

The ASRock z390 Pro4 does not have an RGB LED header. However, there is a PCH heatsink along the edge of the board to which you can add RGB LEDs. 

Most mid- to high-end motherboards have this feature, especially if they are being marketed toward gamers.

Is the ASRock z390 good?

In our opinion, the ASRock z390 Pro4 is a good motherboard considering its price and range of features. Its memory performance is the best in the ASRock z group, which is great if you plan on using spec-heavy applications.

This board is great for casual users who rely on their PCs mainly for work. However, we wouldn’t recommend this motherboard to gamers.

Customer Reviews

‘I ordered the ASRock z390 Pro4 from the Amazon Warehouse second-hand. Because of this, I realized that a few pieces might be missing when I got the board.

I was happy to find a brand-new motherboard in the box along with all the bonus material. The only thing that told me it was used was the distressed box.

The ASRock z390 is a basic board that has slightly above average VRM’s. I tried 9900k on the board. I’ve worked with the 9900k before and I know that it can hold 5.2 without an issue however, with this board it stalled at 4.9 before the VRM’s overheated at 1.3v.

But that isn’t why I got this model. This is a low-tier board that isn’t meant for major overclocking and high voltages.

I tested the 9900ks, running at 5GHz at 1.2v and the board handled it without an issue. My pc build had a 9100f and the ASRock z390 handled that fine as well.

The installation was also pretty straightforward. I paired the board with a set of Corsair Vengeance LPX 3200 XMP memory (2x8GB) and it ran flawlessly and passed the overnight memtest run.’

Vine Voice

5/5 stars

‘I regret buying the ASRock z390 Pro4 because while it was cheap, for a few extra dollars I could’ve gotten so many more features. At first, this board fit fine but I quickly realized that the small features like the number of USB headers, the fan, and all-in-one headers were way too limiting for my liking.

I then had to buy a splitter and extension cables that ended up costing just as much as if I were to buy another board.

The instructions were also really hard to understand, and I was trying to figure out the best way to configure it to stick memory and m.2 drive and I could not find the information. I also think that there aren’t enough USB connections on both the rear panel and board headers.

I will say that the board was easy to get up and running and the BIOS did what I wanted it to do. I used the built-in video until the card arrived and that worked better than I expected.

Overall, I just think that if you’re as frugal as I am, you will find that spending the extra few dollars will get you many more features and avoid any unexpected costs and messy cable routing.’

Road Rage

3/5 stars

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